Mathematics

curriculum information and resources

Grade 9 Standard Mathematics

Grade 9 Standard Mathematics is split into six units of varied length. In Semester 1 students review linear relationships, number operations, surface area, volume and deductive and transformational geometry. In Semester 2 students investigate trigonometry, a variety of function types, probability, and discrete mathematics. Throughout the course these mathematical principles are linked to real world applications.

Students are assessed using the MYP mathematics criteria, which are based on the objectives of the course. The criteria are

A: Knowledge and Procedures

B: Investigating Patterns

C: Communication in Mathematics

D: Reflection in Mathematics.

The criteria are included further down this page for your reference.

In addition to finishing assigned class work, students will also have a “MathMate” skill sheet to complete each week. Every month students will sit a short test based on the MathMates of the previous four weeks.

Students are required to bring a graphics calculator (available for purchase from the school), ruler, blue or black pen, pencil, eraser, and their mathematics textbook and journal to every lesson.

Please take the time to look up the webpage of your child’s teacher. Links to these webpages are provided on the sidebar of the mathematics homepage.

Units

Taxis (7 weeks)

In this unit students will review operations on rational numbers and extend this to irrational numbers. They will also review work on linear relationships and try to model real-life situations that can be solved by using simultaneous equations.

Writing a Proposal (4 weeks)

In this unit students investigate how they can use their knowledge of estimation, errors, capacity, surface area and volume to design a storage facility for grain and water to serve a village of 50 families.

Building with Math (6 weeks)

In this unit students investigate geometrical properties of shapes. They use transformations, congruent and similar triangles, circle and angle theorems, scale drawing and trigonometric properties of right angled triangles.

Environmental Modelling (10 weeks)

In this unit students investigate how functions can be used to model the world around them. They investigate how exponential and quadratic functions can be used to model situations relating to the environment and also investigate index laws.

Game of Pig (6 weeks)

In this unit students will study how to find the probability of single and multiple events. They will apply their knowledge to create a game of chance and to think about taking risks in general.

Discrete Mathematics (3 weeks)

In this unit students will investigate the properties of logic and networks.

Criteria

Criterion A: Knowledge and Understanding

Achievement Level

Descriptor

1-2

The student generally makes appropriate deductions when solving simple problems in familiar contexts.

3-4

The student generally makes appropriate deductions when solving more complex problems in familiar contexts.

5-6

The student generally makes appropriate deductions when solving challenging problems in a variety of familiar contexts.

7-8

The student consistently makes appropriate deductions when solving challenging problems in a variety of contexts including unfamiliar situations.

Context: the situation and the parameters given to a problem.

Unfamiliar Situation: challenging questions or instructions set in a new context in which the students are required to apply knowledge and/or skills they have been taught

Deductions: reasoning from the general to the particular/specific to reach a conclusion from the information given.

Criterion B: Investigating Patterns

Achievement Level

Descriptor

1-2

The student applies, with some guidance, mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize simple patterns.

3-4

The student applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, and suggests relationships or general rules.

5-6

The student selects and applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, describes them as relationships or general rules, and draws conclusions consistent with findings.

7-8

The student selects and applies mathematical problem-solving techniques to recognize patterns, describes them as relationships or general rules, draws the correct conclusion consistent with correct findings, and provides justifications or a proof.

Pattern: the underlining order, regularity or predictability between the elements of a mathematical system. To identify a pattern is to begin to understand how mathematics applies to the world in which we live. The repetitive features of patterns can be identified and described as relationships or generalized rules.

Justification: give valid reasons or evidence to support the conclusion and explain why the rule works.

Proof: a mathematical demonstration of the truth of the relationship or general rule.  A student who describes a general rule consistent with incorrect findings will still be able to achieve in the 5-6 band, provided that the rule is of an equivalent level of complexity.

Criterion C: Communication in Mathematics

Achievement Level

Descriptor

1-2

The student shows basic use of mathematical language and/or forms of mathematical representation.

The lines of reasoning are difficult to follow.

3-4

The student shows sufficient use of mathematical language and forms of mathematical representation.

The lines of reasoning are clear though not always logical or complete.

The student moves between different forms of representation with

5-6

The student shows good use of mathematical language and forms of mathematical representation.

The lines of reasoning are concise, logical and complete.

The student moves effectively between different forms of representation.

Mathematical language: The use of notation, symbols, terminology and verbal explanations

Forms of mathematical representation: Refers to formulae, diagrams, tables, charts, graphs, and models, used to represent mathematical information

Criterion D: Reflection in Mathematics

Achievement Level

Descriptor

1-2

The student attempts to explain whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem.

The student attempts to describe the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life.

3-4

The student correctly but briefly explains whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem.

The student describes the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life where appropriate.

The student attempts to justify the degree of accuracy of his or her results where appropriate.

5-6

The student critically explains whether his or her results make sense in the context of the problem.

The student provides a detailed explanation of the importance of his or her findings in connection to real life where appropriate.

The student justifies the degree of accuracy of his or her results where appropriate.

The student suggests improvements to his or her method where appropriate.

Describe: Give a detailed account. 

Explain: Give a detailed account including reasons or causes. 

Justify: Give a clear and logical mathematical explanation.